Schammasch – Triangle, an Analysis Of

covertriangle2The Swiss avant-garde black metal band Schammasch – name taken from Šamaš, the Mesopotamian God of Justice – will release their third full-length album, simply titled Triangle, on April 29th. As the name suggests, the concept of this highly ambitious work is tripartite, each side clocking in at 33:30. Yes, that makes for more than a hundred minutes of music! Inspired by Richard MacDonald‘s sculptures, the cover album portrays circus artist Sasha Krohn, falling into nothingness, photographed by Ester Segarra. Every side of the Triangle has its own identity, and feels very unique, they deal with various concepts, Read more

Book of Sand – Occult Anarchist Propaganda & Elegy

Book of Sand is an experimental one-man band shrouded in mystery. Just trying to put a name on the person behind it would require an extensive investigation; for now, they refer to themselves only as “d”, or “dcrf”. Since 2009, they have nine releases, one of which being a split with The Skin Horse. Last year, I reviewed The Face of the Deep, which I described as unworthy of listening, but upon further reflection provides a unique albeit rather abstract experience, and can be enjoyed for what it is, simply.

Earlier this year, Book of Sand released two albums: … Read more

Rikard Sjöblom – The Unbendable Sleep

I’ve been into the progressive rock band Beardfish for a while, my favorite album of theirs being their two parter “Sleeping In Traffic.” I also enjoyed their latest album 4626+Comfortzone quite a bit. So I was excited to hear what the band’s frontman Rikard Sjöblom had in store for his second solo album “The Unbendable Sleep”.

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Rikard’s unique and catchy melodies paired with his distinct vocals makes for some interesting music to say the least. This album flows well but also goes unexpected places. One of which being a short interlude track “Building A Tent For Astor” which is a … Read more

Armand Jourdain – Entre deux

Armand Jourdain is a French self-taught musician who likes to blend djent to jazz and world/folk music. It’s really not the other way around because there is just so little heavy moments compared to the amount of lighter ones that it can’t be classified as a heavy metal release.

This short, three-track EP maintains this style of keeping the djent just for the more intense parts. This is a good trick, as it allows for a wide dynamic range, and the rise in intensity can be truly felt, rather than implied. However, it most likely turns off most djent kids. … Read more

Túcan – Towers

This band was brought to my attention by someone posting it on our facebook page, describing it as “highly experimental flamenco”. I was immediately in love. Also I’d like to reiterate the fact that we do take submissions, so send us anything and everything you love and we’ll skim the best. Do you think I create new avant bands out of thin air? Nah, it’s all about connections.

So… Tower is Túcan‘s second full-length album, and their fourth release if we don’t count the singles that ended up on this album. Straight away, the band is a “big band” … Read more

The Eyjafjallajökull, double Icelandic metal review: Momentum and Misþyrming

Momentum started out in 2003, in the capital Reykjavik, where more than a third of Iceland’s population resides. With black and death metal roots, they have evolved their very own sound, which could be vaguely described as psychedelic progressive doom. Their latest album, The Freak Is Alive, shows the band in its best form yet: heavy and slow riffs, intricate drumming, low vocals that sound like they’re from a Russian choir, and the use of uncommon instrumentation in some parts (sitar and bells, for example). All of this makes for an interesting listen that doesn’t wear out after repeated… Read more

Review: Tigran Hamasyan – Mockroot

The rhythm section on Mockroot: (from left to right) Sam Minaie (bass), Tigran Hamasyan, and Arthur Hnatek (drums)  CREDIT: Maeve Stam

The rhythm section on Mockroot (from left to right), Sam Minaie (bass), Tigran Hamasyan, and Arthur Hnatek (drums)
CREDIT: Maeve Stam

Being a musical genius is hard. Not in the, “Oh, I’m a musical genius, I’m so oppressed, pity me” sense, but rather in the sense that one must live up to the expectations one has created. This is of course not a problem limited to the realm of music; all artists must ultimately struggle with it. If an artist has released material before, their new work is inevitably, and necessarily, put into a particular context. One must walk a … Read more

Review: Becca Stevens Band – Perfect Animal

Becca Stevens‘ crowdfunding campaing was probably the most infuriating one I’ve ever participated in. Their new album, Perfect Animal was set on being released in fall of 2014, and was crowd-funded to cover the expenses of recording, mixing and mastering (which was already made at that point), and to fund the promotion, album art, and printing vinyl and CD. I am really fine with this kind of crowdfunding: the album’s [almost] ready for delivery, and even if the goal was not met, it would still get released, not like other shitty campaigns.

And then we were left in … Read more

Review: Fountainhead – Home EP

I’m glad the first album I get to review in 2015 is from Tom, Fountainhead. Tom, the fretless guitarist, at least that’s what we know him for, mostly on his Fear Is The Enemy album, which was highly praised by us and the rest of the metal community, even if it was barely metal at all.

Now, on Home, it’s more relaxed than ever. Remember the epic, inspiring strings? That’s mostly gone, now, but no need to worry, this folk-alternative-experimental sound, vaguely reminiscent of Sufjan Stevens, is really something to enjoy. The songs are perfectly crafted and executed. … Read more