Big|Brave – Ardor



Big|Brave is a Montréalais doom-leaning experimental rock trio, and they’re releasing their latest full-length, Ardor, on September fifteen. With only three tracks, the album manages to go on for almost forty-five minutes. Their sound is overwhelmingly huge and hopelessly, crawlingly slow, yet Robin’s voice, at the forefront of the music, sounds fragile and vulnerable. This apparent dichotomy moulds Big|Brave’s sound into something rather unique. The desolate songs are really drawn out and quite uneventful, but so emotionally crushing it’s terrifying. With only two guitars and a drumkit – and a voice –, Big|Brave are able to craft some of … Read more

Seiðlæti – Þagnarþulur

The Icelandic entity Seiðlæti recently released their debut album, Þagnarþulur. The folk music duo – Uni and Reynir – interprets there seventeen poems with minimalistic, ritualistic percussions conveyed by a total of six musicians. Right off the bat, I have to draw some easy comparison between Uni’s voice and world-famous Icelandic singer Björk. Both voices share some timbral similarities, especially when referring to the less experimental, folk side of the latter. Maybe it’s the inherent sonority of íslenska that bring the two closer in my head, but whether that is the case or not, I want you to know … Read more

Gravetemple – Áthatolhatatlan félelmek

Gravetemple‘s newest barrage of sound, Áthatolhatatlan félelmek (English title: Impassable Fears), comes out on June second. This experimental, droning, and abstract death metal album consists of Hungarian chants screamed through a musical haze consisting of mostly low-register notes, uncertain rhythmics, and absent melodies. If you want a more imaged comparison, I’d say it’s like listening to Portal underwater. Áthatolhatatlan félelmek is really an odd but entrancing release. It’s relatively short, the meat of it being concentrated in three songs – ‘A szarka’, ‘Elavúlt földbolygó’, and ‘Áthatolhatatlan félelmek’ -, making up around twenty-seven minutes, and the three other tracks … Read more

The Deathtrip – Deep Drone Master

the-deathtrip-deep-drone-master-cdThe first thing we realize upon setting foot in Deathtrip’s personal hell is that this album contains something reminiscent of the great black metal records of the 90s. Riff-wise and sound-wise, it definitely sounds up to date, but its primitiveness and immediacy surely recaptures some of the old magic of the genre’s origin.

After a brief intro, we are taken aback by the razor-sharp riffing of the ‘Flag of Betrayal’. Aldrahn’s performance is definitely a highlight (as is in every song), his versatility and charisma give him a primary role, driving the listener through his own uninhabited and inhospitable … Read more