Les chants du hasard – Les chants du hasard


Note: this bandcamp stream contains only an early version of one track and not the final version I listened to for this mini-review.
Les chants du hasard is a mysterious solitary project from France that’s throwing the traditional metal instruments by the window in favour of a completely orchestral work. The classical instruments are joined by the delirious voice of the so-called Hazard, only soul behind the ambitious project. The synthetic orchestra is convincing enough, except a rare few occasions where their electronic nature pierces through; the main culprits are the percussions. Easily disregarded, this minor detail should not obscure … Read more

White Ward – Futility Report

mulating our opinion of an album before diving back into the endless sea of new releases. Sometimes, however, a confluence of factors generates a scenario in which one album stays in rotation for an extended stay before pen gets put to paper. White Ward‘s Futility Report is an album I’ve been trying to write about since January, when I heard its first publicly released song. It took about 30 seconds of that track to convince me this was a band worth paying attention to. They were kind enough to send me a review copy, but shortly thereafter, the always-excellent … Read more

Ghost Bath – Starmourner


Ecstasy. Joy. Paradise. Cosmos. “A surrealistic journey through the heavens drenched in sorrow.” That’s how American blackgaze band Ghost Bath describes Starmourner, a direct sequel to a trilogy which started with their 2015 release Moonlover, a forty-two minute exploration on humanity’s melancholy and depression; it managed to be one of my favorite releases of that year due to the beauty encased within its dark sound. Two years later and signed to Nuclear Blast, one of metal’s biggest labels, Ghost Bath returns with the aforementioned Starmourner, their longest and most ambitious album to date, changing their topics to deliver … Read more

Schammasch – Triangle, an Analysis Of

covertriangle2The Swiss avant-garde black metal band Schammasch – name taken from Šamaš, the Mesopotamian God of Justice – will release their third full-length album, simply titled Triangle, on April 29th. As the name suggests, the concept of this highly ambitious work is tripartite, each side clocking in at 33:30. Yes, that makes for more than a hundred minutes of music! Inspired by Richard MacDonald‘s sculptures, the cover album portrays circus artist Sasha Krohn, falling into nothingness, photographed by Ester Segarra. Every side of the Triangle has its own identity, and feels very unique, they deal with various concepts, Read more

Book of Sand – The Face of the Deep

RELEASE-distro-bookofsandBook of Sand is a black metal one-man band that has been around since 2009, and The Face of the Deep is their fifth full-length. It seems that, specifically for this release, they went out of their way and dove head first in experimental and avant-garde waters. However I feel they did so in the shallow and might have broken their neck…

Their previous catalogue comprises pretty traditional black metal with various external influences that almost go unnoticed if it were not for the addition of violin. Some songs are very decent, like “Arran Boat Song“, with its contemplative monotony, … Read more

Atena – Shades of black won’t bring her back

In your fucking face. That is how this album will feel and that is great. Catchy grooves that are met with interesting layers and song structure bring life to this album. It just keeps you interesting in the content while giving you dynamic range to rest your ears from the typical squashed modern sound many bands seem to enjoy.

Atena seems like the kind of band that would be excellent to see live. Shouting, singing, grooves for days just make you want to shout along with the band and push everyone around you.

The production on it is a great … Read more

The Eyjafjallajökull, double Icelandic metal review: Momentum and Misþyrming

Momentum started out in 2003, in the capital Reykjavik, where more than a third of Iceland’s population resides. With black and death metal roots, they have evolved their very own sound, which could be vaguely described as psychedelic progressive doom. Their latest album, The Freak Is Alive, shows the band in its best form yet: heavy and slow riffs, intricate drumming, low vocals that sound like they’re from a Russian choir, and the use of uncommon instrumentation in some parts (sitar and bells, for example). All of this makes for an interesting listen that doesn’t wear out after repeated… Read more