Kaipa – Children of the Sounds

I first discovered Kaipa about a decade ago when I was really into The Flower Kings and was exploring their various side projects. The Flower Kings frontman Roine Stolt was a member of Kaipa during the late 70s (when he was only 17), and during their reformation in the early 2000s, but left after their 2005 album Mindrevolutions. Children of the Sounds, out on September 22nd, is now the eighth album since Kaipa’s return, and thirteenth overall.

The dynamic between Patrik Lundström’s and Aleena Gibson’s vocals is quite powerful and something that has always stood out to me … Read more

iamthemorning – Lighthouse

lighthouse350x350Russian progressive chamber duo iamthemorning has been a growing name over these years since the release of their debut album, entitled “~”, which blends chamber music with touches of progressive rock to create a beautiful atmosphere formed in majority by Gleb Kolyadin’s amazing piano work and Marjana Semkina’s astonishing vocals. Their sophomore record, “Belighted”, saw the band increasing its potential and audience. Lighthouse, their second KScope release, reaches new levels of sound and ambition to deliver a touching work of art. For this release, they’ve enlisted the help of Porcupine Tree’s musicians Colin Edwin (bass) and Gavin Harrison (drums), … Read more

Rikard Sjöblom – The Unbendable Sleep

I’ve been into the progressive rock band Beardfish for a while, my favorite album of theirs being their two parter “Sleeping In Traffic.” I also enjoyed their latest album 4626+Comfortzone quite a bit. So I was excited to hear what the band’s frontman Rikard Sjöblom had in store for his second solo album “The Unbendable Sleep”.

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Rikard’s unique and catchy melodies paired with his distinct vocals makes for some interesting music to say the least. This album flows well but also goes unexpected places. One of which being a short interlude track “Building A Tent For Astor” which is a … Read more

July Recommendations

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Here’s the monthly recommendations post you’ve awaited for so long! Ah, who am I kidding? I’m the only one reading this blog! Anyways, what are the unmissable releases of July 2015, according to the three-legged raven?

First off is Ethan McKenna‘s sophomore, In Transition. It’s what I’d call an acoustic prog album. Ethan makes use of advanced techniques on his acoustic, like percussive playing, loads of harmonics, and some slap and tapping too, for good measure. Even though its main focus is on the acoustic guitar, it’s well-accompanied by the usual bass and drums, and sometimes even by … Read more

Review: Rise – Resilience

1You, mere mortals, subordinate readers, can only listen to one of the songs from Rise‘s Resilience upcoming album, through the video above: About Duality. But trust me, your supreme guide and musical spirit, this album will be on a lot of year’s end lists, ours first! Let’s dig a bit to try and understand why.

The manifesto of Rise is all about bringing back romanticism in modern music, specifically a blend of metal, hardcore, metalcore, alternative, and other trace elements. Romance is all about evoking emotions, stimulating the imaginary, and blowing an atmosphere around itself, engulfing the beholder … Read more

Review: Becca Stevens Band – Perfect Animal

Becca Stevens‘ crowdfunding campaing was probably the most infuriating one I’ve ever participated in. Their new album, Perfect Animal was set on being released in fall of 2014, and was crowd-funded to cover the expenses of recording, mixing and mastering (which was already made at that point), and to fund the promotion, album art, and printing vinyl and CD. I am really fine with this kind of crowdfunding: the album’s [almost] ready for delivery, and even if the goal was not met, it would still get released, not like other shitty campaigns.

And then we were left in … Read more

Review: Fountainhead – Home EP

I’m glad the first album I get to review in 2015 is from Tom, Fountainhead. Tom, the fretless guitarist, at least that’s what we know him for, mostly on his Fear Is The Enemy album, which was highly praised by us and the rest of the metal community, even if it was barely metal at all.

Now, on Home, it’s more relaxed than ever. Remember the epic, inspiring strings? That’s mostly gone, now, but no need to worry, this folk-alternative-experimental sound, vaguely reminiscent of Sufjan Stevens, is really something to enjoy. The songs are perfectly crafted and executed. … Read more